Lauperland is dedicated, with love, to

CYNDI LAUPER

Mom.Singer.Activist.Actress

Co-founder True Colors United

Songwriters Hall of Fame Inductee

Tony™Award Winner

Grammy™ Awards Winner

Emmy™ Award Winner

Billboard Icon Award Winner

NY Times Best-selling Author

MTV Video Music Awards Winner

American Music Awards Winner

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The article appears on page 8 to 15. Only parts of the article are written here but there is more about Cyndi in the article.

This has been typed by Keiko Akiba.

 

Cyndi & Madonna; They're So Unusual

I started singing for a living because when I sing I really do feel free. I had the desire to show them like ripping open your shirt like Isadora Duncan and saying, "Here I am."    -Cyndi Lauper-

In another part of the article:

 

I'm glad to have a girl-following, because I want to encourage them. I try to be get strength and courage and purpose, I want to show a new woman.

 

How can you criticize a woman for having a sexuality when men for years and years have been singing about nothing else? Madonna's just doing her thing. My thing happens to be different. Women have a sexuality that shouldn't be suppressed.

 

We get talking about rock pygmies that live underground and come up for wampanini juice, so I say to myself, "This must be the kind of new manager I need."

She's Just Doing Her Thing
-OPINION-

Cyndi Lauper and Madonna are reiventing pop's feminine mystique with hot videos and wild styles.

 

Cyndi Lauper and Madonna have a lot in common. Both sport shocks of wild hair, dress in mix-and mismatch and fleasale fashion and project cartoon images of themselves. But the similarities end there. When Cyndi Lauper screams out "Money Changes Everything" as an accusation and exorcism - there's a tone of touygh-minded worldliness that's far removed from the pompons and helpless pining of a Connie Francis.

 

Madonna has managed to make shattered taboos into a new foundation for old stereotypes. Lauper by contrast, has successfully used the resources of rock to project the image of a new woman. The most encourageing of all though may simply be the sheer variety of music, and of role models, now available. The woman making a living in rock today include pinups and daredevils, cynics and dreamers, a few honest voices and a lot of pretty faces, just like the man. Despite the sexual exploitation and prejudices that remain, that's a rough kind of parity - and long overdue.